CH vs SH Minimal Pairs – /tʃ/ and /ʃ/ – American English Listening and Pronunciation Practice

CH vs SH Minimal Pairs – /tʃ/ and /ʃ/ – American English Listening and Pronunciation Practice

CH vs SH Minimal Pairs – /tʃ/ and /ʃ/ – American English Listening and Pronunciation Practice

CH vs SH Minimal Pairs – /tʃ/ and /ʃ/ – American English Listening and Pronunciation Practice

To produce the CH or /tʃ/ sound: press the tongue tip against the gum ridge behind the top front teeth while the sides of the tongue press against the inside of the upper teeth — preventing air from leaving the vocal tract until the tongue is released with friction — that is, the air should build up before the tongue is released. The CH or /tʃ/ sound is UNVOICED stop sound — meaning the vocal cords do not vibrate and the sound cannot be held. (The /ʤ/ or J sound results when the vocal cords vibrate.)

To produce the SH or /ʃ/ sound: the lips are slightly tense and protrude forward as they do when you shush someone. The tongue is high in the mouth with the sides touching the insides of the back teeth with air forced over the center of the tongue, encountering friction at the back of the tooth ridge. It is a continuous unvoiced sound — meaning the sound can be held for a period of time and the vocal cords do not vibrate. (If the vocal cords vibrate, the /ʒ/ or ZH sound results).

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